Me as a Student

Here I am, yet again, running behind schedule for my uni work. Gah!

I teach them at school. The ones that stagger through the door, untied shoes, no workbooks, only one pen (which is doubling as a hair accessory), half a sandwich (the other half eaten on the way to school as there was no time for breakfast), and a good story. #studentlyf they tell me and #yolo.

That’s me.

I am the mother of Spiderman (3), Ironman (5) and Toothless (2); three little boys who happen to take on new identities each time they wake up. The wife of a cop. Primary school teacher. Student.

Even though my ability to stay on top of all work deadlines may wain, I am loving studying. I love learning. I love the feeling of being TOTALLY overwhelmed by things I have no idea about and setting myself a challenge to overcome. Thankfully in this program, successfully.

This course (NGL) will be my sixth course as part of my M.Ed. I like gaining a deep understanding of topics I perhaps otherwise wouldn’t think about. I like presenting my findings and new found knowledge in different ways. I LOVE that we are no longer confined to the rigid requirements of academic writing to show our course understanding.

I do not like ongoing assessment! lol, should have looked at that before I signed up! Even though I totally believe in ongoing assessment, and as a teacher I use ongoing formative assessments as a rule. It makes sense. BUT as a student, I do not like it! Instead, I love meeting big deadlines and the adrenaline that starts pumping a couple of days before an assessment piece is due. I love the pressure. Three days of pressure. Twice a semester. Three times a year. Ongoing assessment is a struggle. So much pressure, all the time!

However, there is a part of me that is excited by the notion of ongoing learning. Not just learning for six days. My understanding of NGL at the moment, is informed by my previous coursework and my day to day living and teaching. The idea that we are constantly learning, have access to information 24/7 through various devices and can pretty much learn anything, at anytime through MOOCS and YouTube (to name just two) both excites and scares me. We can network with, follow and subscribe to experts in every field and chat to people in other continents easier than it is to sometimes chat to those living under our own roof! Crazy times!

“Globalisation” as a catchphrase of 21st Century living. But how does this effect my teaching and learning. How do I ensure I am up to date with the latest educational trends and research. Does NGL in schools entail more than just Twitter and Blogs?

As a student, (even if I do exhibit poor student habits) I am excited by the prospect of a course that (excuse the cliché) “practices what it preaches”. So many courses I have undertaken as part of my Masters advocate “transformational learning” through constructivist pedagogies. However, all but a few have managed to teach in such a way.

I look forward to not only taking the content of this course away, but also the pedagogies, frameworks and tools utilised in the teaching of this course, to inform and “transform” my practise as a teacher and as a learner.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Me as a Student

  1. When you worry about keeping up with all the research, I’m wondering whether that suggestion fits with a NGL perspective? Or whether it’s a hang over from a previous conception of knowledge/learning etc.

    There’s the principle of connectivism “learning is more critical than knowing”. Does keeping up mean having the right network connections that keep you up to date? Or is it the right network connections to find out what you need, when you need to know it? Or is it a bit of both?

    Then there’s the Siemens’ idea of “know where replacing know what and know how”. There is simply too much information for one person to know.

    There’s a strong societal notion that you have to know. It has to sit in your head, otherwise you don’t know. Don’t think that fits with an NGL world view.

    What do you think?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s